Vaccines DO NOT cause autism

I can’t believe I am writing this. I can’t believe the vaccines and autism thing is back, again. But President-elect Trump has repeatedly endorsed this false claim, and even met recently with Robert F. Kennedy Jr., a noted proponent of this idea, about the possible creation of a new anti-vaccine arm of the federal government.

In case someone reading this doesn’t know the facts: Vaccines DO NOT cause autism. There is no scientific or medical controversy about this. It is unequivocal fact. The original paper that claimed a link appeared in the Lancet in the late 1990’s. It later turned out that the data was fabricated, the paper was retracted, and the lead author was stripped of his medical license. The issue was studied further, and multiple large studies show absolutely no link and confirm that vaccines are incredibly safe. It’s just plain not true.

Bad science claims often have teeth. They cling on in the public consciousness for extended periods after being disproven within the scientific or medical communities. The vaccines and autism one is particularly bad. In some areas of the U.S., vaccination rates have fallen sharply due to this mistaken belief, causing cases of things like mumps and whooping cough to drastically increase. When my daughter was born, I worried a lot about whooping cough because at the time I lived in an area with decreasing vaccination rates due to false autism fears. Whooping cough is pretty harmless to healthy people, presenting similarly to a bad cold. But in newborn infants or people with weakened immune systems, whooping cough can kill.  The whooping cough vaccine is not safe to give to these populations, meaning they must rely on others to vaccinate themselves. Every parent that chose not to vaccinate their child because of a false belief they might get autism increased the chance my premature baby might die. Of course I insisted that all of my family receive the vaccine, including extended family that might visit, and I vaccinated my child as soon as it was safe to do so at age 2 months (this is the age of the first dose, but subsequent doses are also needed).

If you are a parent considering skipping or delaying the DTaP for your child (the one that prevents whooping cough, along with tetanus and diphtheria) or any other vaccine, consider that your actions might kill someone else’s beloved newborn baby. Your child might kill a baby just by coughing near him or her in a grocery store and never even know it. The threat is very real, and vaccines are clearly very effective and life-saving. According to the CDC, before the DTaP vaccine approximately 8,000 people died from whooping cough every year in the US, most of them infants. In the period 2000-2014, 277 died from whooping cough (241 of those under 3 months of age), for an average of around 19 people/year. That’s a huge improvement over 8,000, but this important progress is being undone by Mr. Kennedy, Mr. Trump, and parents who listen to their vaccine hysteria.

I find all of this especially scary and insulting as the parent of a child with autism.  I have been asked by complete strangers if I vaccinated my child and if that’s why she has autism.  Of course my child is fully vaccinated. To do otherwise is extremely irresponsible. And no, it has nothing to do with her autism. She would have autism whether she was vaccinated or not, but at least with the vaccines she won’t have autism AND the mumps. And thanks to me and parents like me, your child is less likely to get mumps and your baby is less likely to die from whooping cough.

For the love of God or whatever you find holy, please please please vaccinate your children. There has never been a clearer moral parenting choice. Any controversy on vaccines is 100% fabrication, and any doctor, politician, or other authority figure who says otherwise should be considered untrustworthy.

Advertisements